Scientist, storyteller, author.

In Quest of Creativity

In Quest of Creativity 

A fictional account of life in old age; how compassion, friendship, and connections may help in facing the growing problems of Alzheimer’s related to aging issues; and stories of how being creative and doing simple things might contribute to living a healthy life in the final years of old age.

Candlelight

Candlelight 

Candlelight’ is a lovely collection of “snapshot memories” of an old man (the author’s) and a creative fantasy for an emerging generation who may deliver hopes for the future generations to come. It is a Fictional Memoir.

Magical Moments by Sukur Khan, PhD.

Magical Moments 

An upcoming book about Hank, a memory researcher in his old age, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and is trying to take care of himself by challenging himself to preserve who he is.

Sukur Khan - Scientist Storyteller

Meet Sukur Khan, PhD

Sukur Khan, Ph.D., is a retired scientist who, in old age, enjoys walking, thinking, and sharing his thoughts through fiction. When Sukur’s neurologist diagnosed him with late-onset Alzheimer’s, Sukur spent many days and nights for years learning about the disease and how to cope with it. Sukur is organizing to simplify his daily living in his own world, in his own way, to survive. It’s a matter of everyday living and making decisions and clearly seeing what he is able to fight and what he’s fighting against. He is fighting without knowing the terms of the battle. ​ Sukur published his second book, In Quest of Creativity, March 31, 2019. 

Reviews

“I found it thoughtful, insightful, and full of good information. It must be very hard to get older and begin to lose a sense of the person you have always been. I think you capture that pretty well, and you show how powerful people can be in each other’s lives. I believe the book could be very helpful and poignant to people approaching the closing years of their lives. I particularly liked the character of Maddie. I was able to get some insight into what it must be like to live with a person who is struggling with Alzheimer’s. The way her daughter sacrificed for her was beautiful and the way the mother and daughter were able to touch the people’s lives around them was lovely.”

Jessica Robbins

BOOK REVIEW OF “IN QUEST OF CREATIVITY”

“I liked the story. It’s educating, intriguing, if not as much fascinating. Alzheimer awareness is important & essential. Years ago Maddie and Hank both immigrants to the US from different parts and backgrounds first met in NY when they were in their early fifties- both accomplished & established scientists. Maddie was a neurologist & Hank a scientist.They worked together on various projects for10 years and lost touch. Memory is how we store, recall things we’ve sensed, learned &/or experienced. One listens to heart & unfold the illusion of memory loss. Maddie & Hank when experiencing memory loss, looked to their hearts, while both fighting it due to Alzheimer. They experienced unexpected twists of life & turns of emotions in the way how others feel. Hank thinks and creates, lives in moments, moment to moment & then things go away; he believes and then he is free- but only for the next moment! He enjoys his time & doesn’t seem much confused as he had been! Hank travels to Malta, connects with an old friend & regains self- confidence & becomes news, a creative a writer! The essence of the story is worth spreading about, murmuring & talking about being creative with essence as good as Saffron ( one beautiful key ingredient of this book!)! I hope you like it also! Wish it a success!”

Sabur Khan

BOOK REVIEW OF “IN QUEST OF CREATIVITY”

“The light of faith shines through this memoir from a survivor of the Bangladeshi civil war. Candlelight is the story of how Ravi S. Kahn, a survivor of the Bangladeshi civil war, overcame his depression to find new meaning and purpose in life. The book stands as a testament of hope for humanity’s future. When turmoil, genocide, and civil war ravaged the newly formed nation of Bangladesh, politically outspoken research scientist Kahn found himself on an assassination list. Together with his wife and two small children, he escaped to America where, as a Muslim, he confronted ethnic and religious prejudice as he worked wholeheartedly to support his family and secure their future.But as his children adopted Western ways and forsook their ancient traditions and heritage, Kahn fell into a severe depression complicated by health concerns. Now an octogenarian, Kahn writes in a personable, engaging, and conversational tone as he recounts the joyful and painful events of his life.The clash between the old world, with its centuries-old traditions, and the world he bequeathed to his son—life in America, a land of rapid-fire change, loose connections to place and family, and the freedom to choose to practice any, or no, religion—is revealed in intimate language. “My son had broken the only rule in the relay race of life,” he writes. “For centuries, the male children have carried the baton, or the values and beliefs of the family. It is their job to pass on the family tradition and pride to the next generation.”Kahn deals honestly and openly with the issues of cultural identity, family expectations, aging, personal responsibility, and religion. His journey to understanding and forgiveness required the help of a psychiatrist. This difficult work, though, led to greater realizations and reconciliations, particularly related to his son: “I shouldn’t blame him for doing what I taught him to do—to run as fast as he could to save his family.” Though Kahn chooses to continue with the “light” of faith and tradition that his parents gave to him, he also chooses forgiveness, growth, and creativity, and he writes with great hopefulness about the future that seems possible for the rising generation. This timely and relevant memoir is an intimate portrayal of the loneliness and loss involved in aging, and of today’s clashes between cultures and generations.”

KRISTINE MORRIS

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”

“Candlelight should go #1 standing in the category for ‘wisdom books.’  While I must confess that I have an advantaged perspective because I reviewed the several previous drafts of the final text, I think Ravi’s finished contribution should touch all our hearts.  We have all just been through a rather grim, grisly and discouraging entry into the 21st Century without much that would inspire optimism for and faith in the near future, so Ravi’s undaunted serenity, unbroken spirit in the face of many adversities and sweet apprehensions of the everyday joys of living is a welcome and refreshing commentary…coming for me at just the right time, like a quiet alternative ‘voice crying in the wilderness’ of global malaise.  He has been able to pull off his message of hopefulness even with such a cynic as me, by skillfully avoiding the saccharine or gushy tones that ruin so many other wisdom books for me, and by taking a narrator’s point of view a canny distance above his topics….thereby teasing me with ambiguity about the factual truth of his recollections….and challenging me to dare to argue that important memories are ever veridically accurate.   Well done good friend.”

DR. DAVID HOPKINSON

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”

“Candlelight should go #1 standing in the category for ‘wisdom books.’  While I must confess that I have an advantaged perspective because I reviewed the several previous drafts of the final text, I think Ravi’s finished contribution should touch all our hearts.  We have all just been through a rather grim, grisly and discouraging entry into the 21st Century without much that would inspire optimism for and faith in the near future, so Ravi’s undaunted serenity, unbroken spirit in the face of many adversities and sweet apprehensions of the everyday joys of living is a welcome and refreshing commentary…coming for me at just the right time, like a quiet alternative ‘voice crying in the wilderness’ of global malaise.  He has been able to pull off his message of hopefulness even with such a cynic as me, by skillfully avoiding the saccharine or gushy tones that ruin so many other wisdom books for me, and by taking a narrator’s point of view a canny distance above his topics….thereby teasing me with ambiguity about the factual truth of his recollections….and challenging me to dare to argue that important memories are ever veridically accurate.   Well done good friend.”

DR. DAVID HOPKINSON

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”

“Candlelight should go #1 standing in the category for ‘wisdom books.’  While I must confess that I have an advantaged perspective because I reviewed the several previous drafts of the final text, I think Ravi’s finished contribution should touch all our hearts.  We have all just been through a rather grim, grisly and discouraging entry into the 21st Century without much that would inspire optimism for and faith in the near future, so Ravi’s undaunted serenity, unbroken spirit in the face of many adversities and sweet apprehensions of the everyday joys of living is a welcome and refreshing commentary…coming for me at just the right time, like a quiet alternative ‘voice crying in the wilderness’ of global malaise.  He has been able to pull off his message of hopefulness even with such a cynic as me, by skillfully avoiding the saccharine or gushy tones that ruin so many other wisdom books for me, and by taking a narrator’s point of view a canny distance above his topics….thereby teasing me with ambiguity about the factual truth of his recollections….and challenging me to dare to argue that important memories are ever veridically accurate.   Well done good friend.”

DR. DAVID HOPKINSON

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”

“Superb! Every immigrant should read this book practice their faith with their children to avoid circumstances that will create conflict in the future. Some part was very emotional. Learned a lot how to prepare myself for future generations. Good luck!”

SAYEMA ZERIN

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”

“Candlelight by Ravi S. Kahn, PhD is a stunning book, breathtakingly beautiful through its emotional honesty. The author has written a fictional memoir at the age of 80, but the book surges with the nuclear energy of a young man’s force. I am not sure what a fictional memoir is. I know truth when I read it or hear it. Maybe names have been changed, but the intellectual processes of the author, his bleeding sorrows and regrets, his musings about what he knows and what he doesn’t know, and his loving optimism for a better world when “Generation Fun” will be in its prime, all sum to a brilliant portrait of a life lived and a life to be. The narrator in this book tells the story of his life and the most important people to him through time. The reader quickly understands that the man was a brilliant scientist, an Asian man of Muslim faith, who fled his country for the sake of his family and established them in the United States. It was a time of unconscionable human repression. For reasons explained in the book, the author late in life wonders if his flight with family was a mistake. He goes years suffering depression and regret. Yet, the story reveals what perhaps the author still does not know: he was and is a very brave man. I ended the book feeling dumfounded. It is simply beautiful. I spent some time trying to figure out how I could write a review, but frankly, I have never read anything quite like this. So I am going to make this very simple: Read this book! It is rare to receive ruminations that originate both from intellect and heart. This author does not give you time to judge him. Just when you think that you have figured out his life for him, he transports you warp-speed to a view from a different place in space and time. Read this book. You rarely receive gifts of such lovely quality.​​”

DANIEL WETTA

BOOK REVIEW OF “CANDLELIGHT”